Verification and Authentication of Cards

September 22, 2021

Read this article for answers to these common questions: 

  • How do you know that someone isn’t placing a Cardscore sticker on a different card? 
  • Does Cardscore authenticate cards and what if someone submits a fake? 

 

Verification

When it comes to raw cards, our current level of service allows a user to submit a raw card to be scored by 50-100 collectors. The card owner receives a final Cardscore in their account, a digital sticker, and a physical sticker with a magnetic one touch case in the mail. 

 

It is up to the card owner to place the sticker on the corresponding card. Buyers should be aware that Cardscore does not currently verify cards, but this service is coming very soon. 

 

When verification is rolled out, a card owner will be able to have that card verified at a partner card shop or at a card show. 

 

New cards that have not yet been scored will be placed in the magnetic case on site, and it will be sealed in the case with a tamper evident sticker. After the scoring process is completed, the card owner will receive their Cardscore sticker in the mail that has a serial number which will match the serial number on the original verification sticker. 

 

Cards that have already been scored can be verified too. This process will utilize digital fingerprinting technology. A card owner can scan their card to “prove” that the fingerprint on the card in hand is truly the card that was submitted and scored in our system. If it is, they will receive a confirmation message and at that point the card store or representative at a show can seal off the magnetic case to verify it. It cannot be swapped out without the sticker being voided.

We are already fingerprinting each card that is scanned into our system. You can see an example of this below. If the owner of a card was trying to verify this Trevor Lawerence card, it is only a match to the image on the top and the associated Cardscore serial number.

 

Authentication

On occasion, a counterfeit card is submitted to Cardscore. In these instances, it’s been incredible to see the power of crowdsourcing at work. 

 

For example, last week a 1986 Fleer Michael Jordan card was submitted. Immediately, a few of our scorers reached out to question its authenticity. After our team reviewed the card internally, it was determined that the card was not genuine. 

 

For now, our basic level service includes a cursory review of cards. Scorers can reach out to us by emailing info@cardscore.com if they see a card and believe it could be a counterfeit. Cardscore does not fulfill cards when it is determined that the card might not be authentic. 

 

We will be launching a more formal authentication service in the months ahead. The system will not only use the crowdsourcing process, professional authenticators, but it will also incorporate machine learning into the digital fingerprinting process. The more card data that goes through our system, the smarter the system will get in being able to determine fakes. 

 

Stay tuned and be on the lookout for these new and exciting services in the near future!